You work, have children but pay no childcare: entitlement table

This table gives you an idea of the tax credits you could get if you work at least 16 hours a week. It shows roughly what you could get in total for the current tax year. You can use the table if you have up to three children, and don't pay for childcare.

On this page:

You work, have children but pay no childcare

The amounts shown are the total you could get for the whole of this tax year (6 April 2014 to 5 April 2015). The annual income is before tax and National Insurance are taken off. It's your joint income if you're in a couple.

Annual income (£) One child Two children Three children
0 7,235 9,985 12,740
5,250 7,235 9,985 12,740
9,850 6,630 9,385 12,135
10,000 6,570 9,320 12,075
15,000 4,520 7,270 10,025
20,000 2,470 5,220 7,975
25,000 420 3,170 5,925
30,000 0 1,120 3,875
35,000 0 0 1,825
40,000 0 0 0

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Who should use this entitlement table?

You can use this table if you're:

  • single and working at least 16 hours a week
  • a couple, with one of you working at least 16 hours a week and - between you - you're working at least 24 hours a week

You can also use this table if you're a couple, one of you works at least 16 hours a week, and the other is:

  • 'incapacitated' - this means they're ill or disabled and getting certain benefits, or in certain circumstances National Insurance credits
  • in hospital or in prison
  • entitled to Carer's Allowance - even if they don't get any payments because they receive other benefits instead

Find out more about what 'incapacitated' means for tax credits

Don't use this table if:

  • you work less than 16 hours a week and have children - there is a different table you should use
  • you're a single parent working between 16 and 29 hours a week, and your income is more than £5,250

You can check how much you might get by filling in an online calculator instead - it takes about 10 - 15 minutes to complete.

You work under 16 hours and have children: entitlement table

Tax credits calculator - find out how much you can get

There are other entitlement tables as well. If you're not sure whether you're using the right table you can check by following the link below.

Entitlement tables for tax credits: getting started

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How to use this table

Find the annual income level in the first column that's nearest to your own total income for the last tax year (joint income for couples). This includes income from work, some state benefits (such as contributions-based Jobseeker's Allowance), and other income (such as interest on savings) over £300. A tax year runs from 6 April to 5 April. If your income this tax year is likely to be more than £2,500 lower, you might need to look at a different annual income level. See the next section for how to work out which figure to use.

Find the heading in the other columns that applies to you.

Where the row and column meet, that is the typical amount of tax credits award for those circumstances.

You should use the information in the table as a guide only. The actual tax credits you may get will depend on your own personal circumstances, and may be different to the figures given in the tables.

For a better idea of how much you might be entitled to you can use a more detailed online tax credits calculator. It should take about 10-15 minutes to fill in.

How to work out your income for tax credits

Tax credits calculator - find out how much you can get

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If your income will drop in this tax year by more than £2,500

If your income is likely to drop this tax year by more than £2,500, you might need to look at a different annual income level. Follow the steps below.

Step one. Take your lower income.

Step two. Add £2,500 to it. This is because the Tax Credit Office ignores the first £2,500 of the income drop when working out your payments.

Step three. Find the annual income level in the table that's nearest to your answer.

For example, your income for the last tax year was £30,000. But you estimate that your income will drop to £18,000 for this tax year (6 April 2014 to 5 April 2015). You need to look at the annual income of £20,000 in the table. This is worked out like this:

£18,000 + £2,500 = £20,500. So the nearest income in the table is £20,000.

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What you need to know about some of the income figures

It's worth knowing about some things that apply to some of the income figures in the table.

For the annual income figures of £0 and £5,250, the amount of tax credits shown only applies if you're:

  • single and work at least 16 - but less than 30 - hours a week
  • a couple, one of you works at least 16 hours and - between you - you work under 30 hours a week

For the annual income figures of £9,850 and above, the amounts of tax credits shown only apply if you're:

  • single and work at least 30 hours a week
  • a couple, one of you works at least 16 hours and - between you - you work at least 30 hours a week

If these working hours don't apply to you, you can check the amount you can get by using a more detailed online tax credits calculator.

Tax credits calculator - find out how much you can get

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More useful links

How to claim tax credits

How your tax credits entitlement is worked out

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