Entitlement tables for tax credits - getting started

The amount of tax credits you might get is based on your family circumstances, the hours you work and your income. There are tables that give you an idea of what you might get in total for a year - based on your approximate annual income.

On this page:

What are 'entitlement tables'?

The entitlement tables show you at a glance the total amount of tax credits you might get, for the whole of the current tax year. This started on 6 April 2014 and will end on 5 April 2015.

The tables include the following:

  • different amounts of annual total income - this includes income from work, some state benefits (such as contributions-based Jobseeker's Allowance), and other income (such as interest on savings) over £300
  • different types of personal or family circumstances for example number of children or hours worked
  • tax credits amounts you might get for the different income amounts and personal circumstances

The information in the tables is a guide only. To get a better idea of how much you could get you can use an online calculator. It should take about 10-15 minutes to fill in.

Tax credits calculator - find out how much you can get

How to work out income for your tax credits claim

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Which entitlement table is right for you?

There are five different sets of entitlement tables:

  • one set of tables for people who work but don't have children
  • four sets of tables for people who have children - covering people who work and don’t work

You can find out which one to use by following the guidance below.

If your situation is not covered by any of the entitlement tables, you can check how much you might get by using an online calculator.

Tax credits calculator - find out how much you can get

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You (or your partner) work but you have no children

If you don't have any children, you can only get Working Tax Credit. There are entitlement tables where you can get examples of how much Working Tax Credit you might be able to get if you're:

  • single or in a couple and one of you works 30 hours or more a week
  • single or in a couple where one of you works at least 16 hours a week and that person has a disability

The tables give you an idea of the total amount you could get over a year, based on your annual income.

Go to the entitlement tables if you work but don't have children

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You have children

If you have children and you or your partner work, you may be able to get both Working Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. How much you can get depends on the hours you work, your income and whether you have childcare costs or not.

You work at least 16 hours a week and have childcare costs

You may be able to get back up to 70 per cent of your childcare costs - up to certain limits. The entitlement tables give examples of how much tax credits you could get if you pay for approved or registered childcare.

The tables give you an idea of the total amount you could get over a year, based on your annual income.

Go to the entitlement tables if you work 16 hours or more and pay for childcare

You work at least 16 hours a week and have no childcare costs

You may have children but don't pay out any childcare costs even though you work. There is an entitlement table that gives examples of how much tax credits you could get.

The table will give you an idea of the total amount you could get over a year, based on your annual income.

Go to the entitlement table if you work, have children but no childcare costs

You work less than 16 hours a week and have children

You can use an entitlement table to find out how much tax credits you might get if:

  • you are single and work less than 16 hours a week
  • you have a partner and both of you work less than 16 hours a week

The table will give you an idea of the total amount you could get over a year, based on your annual income.

Go to the entitlement table if you work less than 16 hours a week and have children

You don't work but have children

You can use an entitlement table to find out how much tax credits you might get if:

  • you are single and don't work
  • you have a partner and neither of you work

The table will give you an idea of the total amount you could get over a year, based on your annual income.

Go the entitlement table if you don't work and have children

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More useful links

When to make a joint or single tax credits claim

How to work out usual working hours for your tax credits claim

More about claiming tax credits for children and childcare

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